1. 
What do you think makes you so driven? 
I’m not sure I know, but having been an obedient and nerdy kid, I’m very driven to receive praise. If I were a smarter person, I’d be driven to receive money. I’m a dope—all I want is, “That was real good. Looks like you guys worked real hard on that.” It’s always parent-teacher conference day in my mind.

    What do you think makes you so driven? 

    I’m not sure I know, but having been an obedient and nerdy kid, I’m very driven to receive praise. If I were a smarter person, I’d be driven to receive money. I’m a dope—all I want is, “That was real good. Looks like you guys worked real hard on that.” It’s always parent-teacher conference day in my mind.

  2. My friends at onyxspirits just posted this recipe for The Charter Oak on their FB page. Pretty sure this cocktail demands to be made this weekend and sipped out of a giant mug while watching football in my LL Bean slippers.
—————————
Pour a half gallon of apple cider into a crock pot. Add a couple cinnamon sticks and a few scoops of brown sugar to taste. Slice a clementine or two and throw them in - oranges work as well. Simmer on high for two hours.
In a glass add: - 1 Part Onyx Moonshine - 3 Parts Warm Apple Cider - Top with a dollop of whipped cream- Sprinkle lightly with nutmeg

    My friends at onyxspirits just posted this recipe for The Charter Oak on their FB page. Pretty sure this cocktail demands to be made this weekend and sipped out of a giant mug while watching football in my LL Bean slippers.

    —————————

    Pour a half gallon of apple cider into a crock pot. Add a couple cinnamon sticks and a few scoops of brown sugar to taste. Slice a clementine or two and throw them in - oranges work as well. Simmer on high for two hours.

    In a glass add: 
    - 1 Part Onyx Moonshine 
    - 3 Parts Warm Apple Cider 
    - Top with a dollop of whipped cream
    - Sprinkle lightly with nutmeg

  3. Lia makes a painting — a home improvement story

    While I love our little apartment very much, our bedroom could use some TLC. So, when I saw this big, blue, rothko-esque painting from Orlando Soria’s bedroom I thought it would be easy enough to re-create and add a little color to our room. 

    First, I bought a 5x3 framed painting on craigslist for $50. Yes, I felt bad for painting over someone else’s work but considering any framing, especially for a large piece, costs $$$ I just bit the bullet and forged ahead.

    Then, since I am not a real artist and needed this to be budget, I went to Home Depot to get paint and supplies. I bought a quart of primer and a quart each of Glidden’s Aqua Chintz and Totally Teal (cool paint names guys). In retrospect I probably could have gotten away with getting just a few samples of each but hey, lessons learned.

    Then, I set up shop in my delightfully creepy back alley concrete area. I wish I had gotten an easel or some kind of table that was bigger than my semi-wobbly bedside table to put the canvas on, but I made it work. I primed everything and then taped and painted - first the bottom with a flat coat of the light blue, and then the top which is a more textured coat of the dark blue, similar to the example photo. 

    After everything was dry it went back in the frame and up on our wall! I took a lot of tips from this post from Emily Henderson but this is definitely something you could do on your own if you want to put some simple, colorful art on the walls.

  4. Immediately on board with drunkjcrew

    Immediately on board with drunkjcrew

  5. gobookyourself:

    The Shadow of the Wind by Carols Ruiz Zafón

    For more beautiful storytelling full of twists and turns, try these…

    The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton for a literary murder mystery packed full of complex character, motives and secrets.

    The Bookman’s Tale by Charlie Lovett for a mystery involving an antique bookshop and mysterious paintings.

    The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield for intertwined stories of hidden family secrets about bookshops and novelists. 

    People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks for a reverse chronological story about a book conservator exploring the history of a Jewish illuminated text.

    Get the email | Buy us a coffee

    Reblogging for future reference because I loooooved Shadow of the Wind

  6. Guys, guess what? I GOT A NEW JOB!!!
I have been so excited about this and wanting to tell people but had to wait until I officially gave my notice this morning. I’m going to be starting a new job in the Senate at the end of the month and I’m feeling nervous and excited and a whole bunch of other things. 
I’m looking forward to a new challenge - I think this will be a good one.

    Guys, guess what? I GOT A NEW JOB!!!

    I have been so excited about this and wanting to tell people but had to wait until I officially gave my notice this morning. I’m going to be starting a new job in the Senate at the end of the month and I’m feeling nervous and excited and a whole bunch of other things. 

    I’m looking forward to a new challenge - I think this will be a good one.

  7. Had a chance to walk around Gramercy Park this morning - not a bad way to start the day

  8. Always reblog

  9. 
nprfreshair:
"I was listening to a rabbi’s sermon — this was maybe five or six years ago — and he began by saying that the birth control pill may have been the most important invention of the 20th century. My immediate reaction was, “That’s nuts. That can’t possibly be. I can think of six things off the top of my head that seemed more important than that.” But it stayed with me. I kept thinking about it.
A couple of years went by and I was still thinking about it. His case was that it had changed more than just science, more than just medicine. It had changed human dynamics. It had changed the way men and women get along in the world. It changed reproduction, obviously, but it also created all kinds of opportunities for women that weren’t there before, it had spread democracy. …
If it really was the most important invention of the 20th century, and maybe he was right, why don’t I know how we got there? I don’t know the inventor of the pill. I can tell you the inventor of the telephone and the telegraph and the light bulb, but I have no idea where the pill came from.”
- Jonathan Eig 
So Eig set out to answer these questions and it’s kind of a crazy story.
Check it out: 
The Great Bluff That Lead To A ‘Magical’ Pill And A Sexual Revolution

In high school I wrote a research paper on the history and impact of the pill (did I mention I went to a really neat high school?). I wish this book had existed then but I’ll sure be picking it up now.

    nprfreshair:

    "I was listening to a rabbi’s sermon — this was maybe five or six years ago — and he began by saying that the birth control pill may have been the most important invention of the 20th century. My immediate reaction was, “That’s nuts. That can’t possibly be. I can think of six things off the top of my head that seemed more important than that.” But it stayed with me. I kept thinking about it.

    A couple of years went by and I was still thinking about it. His case was that it had changed more than just science, more than just medicine. It had changed human dynamics. It had changed the way men and women get along in the world. It changed reproduction, obviously, but it also created all kinds of opportunities for women that weren’t there before, it had spread democracy. …

    If it really was the most important invention of the 20th century, and maybe he was right, why don’t I know how we got there? I don’t know the inventor of the pill. I can tell you the inventor of the telephone and the telegraph and the light bulb, but I have no idea where the pill came from.”

    - Jonathan Eig 

    So Eig set out to answer these questions and it’s kind of a crazy story.

    Check it out: 

    The Great Bluff That Lead To A ‘Magical’ Pill And A Sexual Revolution

    In high school I wrote a research paper on the history and impact of the pill (did I mention I went to a really neat high school?). I wish this book had existed then but I’ll sure be picking it up now.

About me

A Connecticut native living in Washington, DC. Lover of food, travel, lady politicians & NPR podcasts.